Convincing Company Leadership to Hear the Customer's Voice - By Egniol

Convincing Company Leadership to Hear the Customer’s Voice

Convincing Company Leadership to Hear the Customer's Voice

It might be difficult to persuade upper management to spend resources on “voice of the consumer” studies that will ultimately benefit the company. Many executives, from CEOs to product owners, know every detail of their goods and the market in which they operate. Yet they rely on this extensive understanding to determine consumer requirements while investing barely any resources in customer research and instead making inferences about customers’ real experiences.

Researching your target audience just once isn’t enough. Customers’ usage patterns and expectations of a given product or service evolve over time. When you don’t put a premium on customer research and regularly validate your expertise, you end up with goods that are based on guesswork rather than solid evidence. Similarly, assumptions and gut feelings sometimes lead to successful products, but more often than not, such creations amount to blind stabs in the dark. These items are often not as sleek and cutting-edge as they promise to be.

In this case, the question becomes how to persuade upper management of the value of continuous consumer insights. And what steps can you take to immediately put this knowledge to work?

One may claim that “research dissolves bonds,” which is a common phrase in the academic world. Researching your customers and using that information to shape your product strategy is an effective way to make decisions that will lead to growth that lasts. Indeed, what group of leaders wouldn’t desire that?

Here are three strategies that have proven effective in getting top-level executives to hear the customer’s perspective. These suggestions can serve as a springboard for your argument in favor of conducting deeper research with your target audience.

Question, "Are we aware of our ignorance?"

Convincing Company Leadership to Hear the Customer's Voice - By Egniol

You may have run across this problem before, yet many executives and product owners incorrectly assume they understand their target audience. This is typically based on outdated data or a single insignificant interaction with an older customer. It’s not uncommon for members of the same production team to hold divergent views on these issues, making it hard to reach a consensus or set priorities.

You may have run across this problem before, yet many executives and product owners incorrectly assume they understand their target audience. This is typically based on outdated data or a single insignificant interaction with an older customer. It’s not uncommon for members of the same production team to hold divergent views on these issues, making it hard to reach a consensus or set priorities.

There are three main groups into which we divide the data when working with clients

Known Knowns: The things we know with absolute certainty

Known Unknown: What we know and what we don’t know

Unknown Unknowns: Possible knowledge gaps we should keep an eye out for

This format, or one like it, could be used to demonstrate the value of having access to more detailed customer information and the challenges that come from not having it.

Inspiring: Scale the entire mountain range, not just one peak

After emphasising the importance of client input, you should show how it may lead to adaptable, innovative goods that grow alongside your business and its market.

Products developed in this manner not only stand a better chance of thriving in their respective niches, but also provide valuable insights into the changing trends in your business, allowing you to stay one step ahead of the competition. Avoiding a plateau isn’t the only concern here. A company’s executive team may be missing out on growth prospects because they aren’t soliciting or acting on customer feedback. Many executives worry about their companies’ ability to survive in the future, and this can help ease their fears.

Perform: Assessing Your Achievements

Convincing Company Leadership to Hear the Customer's Voice - By Egniol

This is related to the previous point we made, but without conducting customer research, how can a business determine whether it is succeeding? How might that progress change once we have more information?

To gauge success, you must first have a firm grasp of where your product or service now stands. Usability, accessibility, and customer happiness are some additional indicators to consider alongside conversion, sales, and adoption. It is possible to track progress over time by conducting repeated surveys as part of a voice of the customer initiative.

Keep in mind that it’s possible you’ll want to initiate a comprehensive customer listening programme of some kind. However, client feedback gathering has the potential to scale. Existing analytics can help you make better strategic use of the user data at your disposal.

Customer insights as a growth driver

There are numerous benefits of paying attention to consumer feedback:

  • It reduces uncertainty and guides product decisions and priorities.
  • You design more adaptable and dynamic products that change with your users.
  • It simplifies strategic decision-making and expands commercial opportunities beyond your niche.
  • You’re not alone if you’re attempting to convince your company’s leadership of the significance of client feedback. However, you have a compelling case for collecting additional data and applying it effectively. Listening to clients is sound business practise.

    Using the aforementioned approaches and ideas, you can persuade your company’s leadership of the importance of listening to customers and contributing to the expansion of your firm.

Add a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment